Commissioners hear megadump foes, approve businesses
Wednesday, May 12, 2010 (15:08:57)

Posted by Admin

The Scotland County Commissioners heard from the public at its last Commissioner's Meeting.

Laurinburg Exchange Article


By John Lentz

Several opponents of the proposed county landfill expansion spoke during the public hearing segment at Monday night's meeting of the Scotland County Commissioners. The first speaker was Helen Livingston of the local S.C.O.T. (Scotland County of Tomorrow) organization, a group that opposed the megadump site that Waste Management, Inc. attempted to locate in Scotland County in 2007. Livingston spoke on what she perceived as the detriments of bringing outside waste to the county.

"The bottom line (of expanding the county waste dump) is that there will be substantial cleanups and fouled drinking water," she said. "The ultimate costs will be beyond the magnitude of what you will receive."

On costs, Livingston said that the citizens of Scotland County "have a right to know how much taxpayer money has already been spent on the megadump site. Informed concerns have been expressed to the commission by a considerable number of constituents." To the commissioners she said: "Please listen to the people."

Dump expansion opponent Tom Gibson read a letter from a friend who lives beside a megadump site in Bishopville, S.C.

"The odor is terrible when an east wind is blowing," he read. "Thousands of seagulls feed on the trash. The citizens of Lee County voted down the landfill, but couldn't stop it, because local councilmen were in favor of it."

Gibson asked the commissioners to consider what he had read.

"I would hope that our commissioners would at least think about its citizens," Gibson said. "We have enough problems here in Scotland County; let's tend to our own waste and not bring in more."

Commissioner John Alford responded when Gibson finished. "I hear you loud and clear," he said.

The board then approved two requests for conditional use applications, one for an in-home, mail order firearms business located at 6401 Peeles Chapel Road in Laurel Hill, and another for Viridian Biomass, a facility that converts organic waste into biofuel. The property is located on Airbase Road in Scotland County on land owned by St. Andrews College. The biomass facility application was approved unanimously, while Commissioner Betty Blue Gholston cast the one dissenting vote against the firearms business owned by Robert Davis.

A rezoning application for a new business on Pea Bridge Road near the South Carolina line was considered following statements by a number of citizens both for and against the proposal.

Planning and Zoning Chairman Henry McLeod introduced the application.

"The request comes from Tracie D. Locklear for 1.54 acres to be rezoned for a country store," McLeod said. "Four neighbors asked that the commission not approve the request, thinking that it will bring 'unwanted, strange' people to the neighborhood. We also have a petition containing 16 names of persons opposing the request, so we recommend that the rezoning not be approved."

The commission then heard statements from residents, most of whom were in favor of the store.

The motion was unanimously approved.

In other business, the commission approved health department staffing requests presented by Director Ron Sapp for two positions in the WIC (Women, Infants and Children) food program, along with two processing assistant positions to work at the health department's registration window.

County Manager Kevin Patterson recommended that a temporary employment agency be utilized to quickly fill these positions. Commissioner Clarence McPhatter questioned this idea, asking why the county should give funds to an outside agency. Patterson explained that while some money would go to an outside agency, the positions could be filled quickly. After some deliberation the motion was approved.

Content received from: Scotland County Of Tomorrow, http://nomegadump.org